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Articles highlighting my photographic style, images, and techniques, photo opportunities at selected locations, with a few tips for photographers on the road.

Pemaquid Point Lighthouse

Pemaquid Point Lighthouse

Pemaquid Point Lighthouse

The Pemaquid Point Lighthouse is another quintessential Maine lighthouse. Lighthouse operation at this location began in 1827. The lighthouse, being located on Pemaquid Point, protects mariners entering Musgongus Bay (east) and Johns Bay (west).

Among the outstanding features of this location are the metamorphic rock formations that run up from the water to the lighthouse. They are a mixture of granite, gneiss, and quartz woven in intricate layers, that can be used to draw strong lines in photo compositions. I visited the lighthouse in the morning to catch the morning twilight and sunrise.

Below are a few images captured at the Pemaquid Point Lighthouse.

Pemaquid Point Lighthouse perched on fantastic metamorphic rock formation.

Pemaquid Point Lighthouse in warm light just after sunrise.

Pemaquid Point Lighthouse set against the pre-dawn sky, which is beginning to glow prior to sunrise.

Sunrise at the Pemaquid Point Lighthouse.

Pemaquid Point Lighthouse and reflection.

Click on the photos above for more information, click the link in the caption to see all photos of this lighthouse, or click here to see more images of lighthouses.

All images © Clarence Holmes

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Portland Head Lighthouse

Portland Head Lighthouse

Portland Head Lighthouse

I have been in Maine for a few days photographing along US route 1. Maine at this time of year is interesting in that the tourists are mostly gone, its just past the fall foliage season, and many places are beginning to close down for the season. A variety of photo opportunities are still available along the rocky coast of Maine including lighthouses and quiet lobster fishing villages.

Below are a few images captured at the Portland Head Lighthouse. The Portland Head Lighthouse (Light Station) was completed in 1791 to protect ships entering Casco Bay, and has been in continuous operation for over 2 centuries. It is a favorite subject of many photographers, and provides photo ops at both sunrise and sunset with many possibilities for interesting foregrounds.

The first rays of sun after sunrise reach the Portland Head Lighthouse, built in 1791, which protects mariners entering Casco Bay. The lighthouse is located in Fort Williams Park, Cape Elizabeth, Maine.

The pre-dawn sky begins to glow behind the Portland Head Lighthouse, Fort Williams Park, Cape Elizabeth, Maine.

The Portland Head Lighthouse under the pre-dawn sky, Fort Williams Park, Cape Elizabeth, Maine.

The rising sun behind the Portland Head Lighthouse, Fort Williams Park, Cape Elizabeth, Maine.

Click on the photos above for more information, or click here to see more images of lighthouses.

All images © Clarence Holmes

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Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge (Sep 15, 2009): American Golden-Plovers

American Golden-Plover

American Golden-Plover

I once again visited Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge on Tuesday, September 15 for bird photography focusing on shorebirds. Throughout my previous visits, there had been a few species which I wanted to capture, but had not been able. Although I had observed both the American Golden-Plover and Pectoral Sandpiper, I was not able to make successful images of these bird species, either due to distance, or in the case of the Pectoral Sandpiper, I only had one fleeting encounter. I had better luck this time.

During my visit I observed the following notable species:

  • American Avocet (2)
  • American Golden-Plover (2) – one adult; one juvenile
  • Pectoral Sandpiper (2)
  • Stilt Sandpiper (10)
  • White-rumped Sandpiper (6)

Below are a few images from the day.

American Golden-Plover (Pluvialis dominica) – molting adult (East Pond, Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge)

American Golden-Plover (Pluvialis dominica) – molting adult sleeping (East Pond, Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge)

American Golden-Plover (Pluvialis dominica) – juvenile (East Pond, Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge)

American Golden-Plover (Pluvialis dominica) – juvenile (East Pond, Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge)

Pectoral Sandpiper (Calidris melanotos) (East Pond, Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge)

Stilt Sandpiper (Calidris himantopus) (East Pond, Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge)

Click on the photos above for more information, click on the species name to see all images of that species, or click here to see more images from Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge.

All images © Clarence Holmes

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Northern Wheatear in Stratford, CT

Northern Wheatear

Northern Wheatear

An adult male Northern Wheatear has been observed at Sikorsky Airport in Stratford, Connecticut for the last few days. The bird has been feeding along a barbed wire fence adjacent to one of the runways, flycatching from a perch on the fence or briefly dropping to the ground to feed on insects. During my visit the Wheatear also flew out and perched on various signs along the runway or on mounds of dirt from a construction project in the parking lot. The bird was in view most of the time I was there.

The Northern Wheatear is a Eurasian species that is only seen occasionally in the eastern US, so this is an opportunity for many interested birders and photographers.

The images below were captured this morning.

Northern Wheatear (Oenanthe oenanthe) – Male flycatching from a barbed wire fence (Sikorsky Airport, Stratford, CT)

Northern Wheatear (Oenanthe oenanthe) (Sikorsky Airport, Stratford, CT)

Northern Wheatear (Oenanthe oenanthe) (Sikorsky Airport, Stratford, CT)

Click on the photos above for more information or click on the species name to see all images of the species.

Below is a map which may help those who are considering going to see this bird.

All images © Clarence Holmes

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Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge (Sep 4, 2009)

American Avocets

American Avocets

I arrived at Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge at 2pm. Bird numbers and species diversity on the northern portion of the East Pond were low. The two previously observed Avocets were present but stayed out of good shooting range until around 4pm.

For the next three hours the bird photography picked up as the Avocets moved closer and a few other species began feeding along the edge of the pond. The afternoon light was good as the sun faded into the slightly cloudy western sky. Below are a few images from the day.

American Avocet (Recurvirostra americana) in flight (East Pond, Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge)

American Avocet (Recurvirostra americana) flapping its wings prior to take-off (East Pond, Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge)

American Avocet (Recurvirostra americana) pair feeding (East Pond, Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge)

American Avocet (Recurvirostra americana) feeding in fading afternoon light (East Pond, Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge)

Late in the afternoon there was a nice group of Lesser Yellowlegs, Short-billed Dowitchers, Stilt Sandpipers, and one Wilson’s Phalarope feeding close to the edge of the pond.

Lesser Yellowlegs (Tringa flavipes) pair take off into flight (East Pond, Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge)

Wilson’s Phalarope (Phalaropus tricolor) in non-breeding plumage searching for food (East Pond, Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge)

Wilson’s Phalarope (Phalaropus tricolor) (East Pond, Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge)

Stilt Sandpiper (Calidris himantopus) (East Pond, Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge)

Click on the photos above for more information, click on the species name to see all images of that species, or click here to see more images from Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge.

All images © Clarence Holmes

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